Neonatal-Safety
Neonatal Safety

Neonatal safety requires the dual consideration of both the mother and the child, therefore, the principles of neonatal and obstetric safety must be integrated cohesively. Our APSS Blueprints provide healthcare organizations with practical, evidence-based checklists for targeted initiatives for senior leaders and frontline staff.

Patient Stories

Statistics

Each year, an estimated 2,000 infants die or are undiagnosed in the U.S. and some 300,000 infants die or are undiagnosed globally1
1.

Salvi, S. (2016, September). Faculty of 1000 evaluation for Global, Regional, and National Age- sex Specific All-cause and Cause-specific Mortality for 240 Causes of Death, 1990-2013: a Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Faculty of 1000 Ltd. doi:10.3410/f.725286838.793523287

More than 30% of CCHD deaths have been attributed to late or missed diagnosis2
2.

Chang, R.-K. R., Gurvitz, M. and Rodriguez, S. (2008). Missed Diagnosis of Critical Congenital Heart Disease. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 162(10), 969. doi:10.1001/archpedi.162.10.969

Screenings show that the number of deaths from CCHD is closer to 120 each year3
3.

Grosse, S. D., Riehle-Colarusso, T., Gaffney, M., Mason, C. A., Shapira, S. K., Sontag, M. K., … Iskander, J. (2017). CDC Grand Rounds: Newborn Screening for Hearing Loss and Critical Congenital Heart Disease. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep, 66, 888–890

Before newborn screening programs were introduced in the U.S. in 2012, it was estimated that between 70-100 infants died each year from late-diagnosed CCHD4
4.

Govindaswami, B., Jegatheesan, P. and Song, D. (2012). Oxygen Saturation Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease. NeoReviews, 13(12), e724–e731. doi:10.1542/neo.13-12-e724)

CCHD causes most of the deaths due to CHD that occur within the first year of life5
5.

Hoffman, J. I. E. and Kaplan, S. (2002). The Incidence of Congenital Heart Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 39(12), 1890–1900. doi:10.1016/s0735-1097(02)01886-7

Each year, nearly 40,000 infants are born with CHD in the U.S., and 1.35 million infants are born with CHD globally6
6.

Hoffman, J. I. E. and Kaplan, S. (2002). The Incidence of Congenital Heart Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 39(12), 1890–1900. doi:10.1016/s0735-1097(02)01886-7

CHD is the most common birth defect, affecting approximately 8 in 1,000 live-born infants7
7.

Reller, M. D., Strickland, M. J., Riehle-Colarusso, T., Mahle, W. T. and Correa, A. (2008). Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects in Metropolitan Atlanta 1998-2005. The Journal of Pediatrics, 153(6), 807–813. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2008.05.059

At 5 years of age, motor impairment, cognitive impairment, and severe hearing loss that is 3-4 times more common in children with severe ROP, typically caused by newborn over-use of supplemental oxygen, than those without it8
8.

Neonatal Safety. (2019, December 4). Retrieved from https://patientsafetymovement.org/actionable-solutions/challenge-solutions/neonatal-safety/

At least 300 infants with an unrecognized CCHD are discharged each year from newborn nurseries in the United States.9
9.

Aamir T, Kruse L, Ezeakudo O. Delayed diagnosis of critical congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVM) and pulse oximetry screening of newborns. Acta Paediatr. 2007;96:1146-1149

Critical congenital heart disease is estimated to affect one out of every 48,000 babies born each year in the U.S.10
Studies show that newborns treated with higher level of oxygen had more cognitive disabilities than those treated with lower oxygen.11
11.

Sun SC. Relation of target SpO2 levels and clinical outcome in ELBW infants on supplemental oxygen. Pediatr Res (2002) 51:A350.

Prevention or minimization of harm through adherence to evidence-based practice guidelines is the best defense against patient harm and malpractice claims.12
12.

Perinatal Safety Intervention Program (PSIP): Design and Development: AHRQ’s 2012 Annual Conference Slide Presentation. December 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. https://archive.ahrq.gov/news/events/conference/2012/track_a/106_hendrich_kamerow/kamerow.html

Birth-associated adverse outcomes result in 2-10% or approximately 80-400,000 cases annually, half of which are preventable.13
13.

Perinatal Safety Intervention Program (PSIP): Design and Development: AHRQ’s 2012 Annual Conference Slide Presentation. December 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. https://archive.ahrq.gov/news/events/conference/2012/track_a/106_hendrich_kamerow/kamerow.html

30-40% of birth-associated adverse outcomes or “near misses” may be preventable through changes in patient, health care provider, and system factors.14
14.

Perinatal Safety Intervention Program (PSIP): Design and Development: AHRQ’s 2012 Annual Conference Slide Presentation. December 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. https://archive.ahrq.gov/news/events/conference/2012/track_a/106_hendrich_kamerow/kamerow.html

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